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The Skeptical OB

  • namaste863

    Thank God. Dr. Any, keep spreading the word. My mother had a partial placental abruption with me (I’m an only child.) even with expert obstetric
    care, there was only a 10% chance that I would make it into this world alive. As it was, I came out profoundly Deaf and with a stenotic aortic valve. If she’d opted for midwifery there’s no way in fuck that I’d lived even long enough to be born, let alone be 27 and starting my Ph.D. In Social Work this fall (Yes, Deafness, shitty aortic valve and all, and with ASL as my native language.)

  • Marguerita

    Yikes. Has anyone already posted this ridiculous article on the Mail about Kate Middleton’s midwives?

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3065678/Call-midwives-calm-duo-delivered-Princess.html

    • I don’t see what the problem is. Other than it being the Daily Mail, which is known to make up all of the content they don’t steal. Remember that midwives function as obstetric nurses do in the US.

    • Wombat

      It looks… normal? UK midwives are university trained, and they were supervised by some very experienced and serious OBGYNs to boot.

      Unless you’re talking about the birth plan/”what the dutchess wants, she gets”….. I got the impression that was more not wanting to be fussed over too much/have abyone else’s birth interrupted, which is pretty darn normal… considerate even, since they more than have the resources to do so. Probably came at least in part from here experience with George. Ultimately it IS just an impression though, since no one not in the room/family knows for sure. Not the newspaper and not us either c:

    • Azuran

      What mainly made me frown is how they felt the need to point out that the doctors supervising the birth were ‘male doctors’, two times.

      • Wombat

        That’s not great, but they made a similar number of references to the midwives gender (heroines, the women), not to mention their title being relatively gender-specific (what would a male midwife be called in that sense, I do wonder sometimes, lol).

        Daily Mail isn’t exactly known for their elegant prose, I’d say it was borderline/could have been worded better but ultimately probably just a descriptor.

        • Male midwives exist. They are called midwives.

          • Wombat

            I figured they exist, I was just unsure if they took the same title (or if there was debate within the field, such as Congresswoman, waitress, etc).

            Edit: upon re-reading that might sound a little snarky. Not meant that way, thank you for the answer, I was just clarifying my original curiosity c:

  • who me
    • Cobalt

      Wow. “Cervical-centric birth culture”.

      “Women want to know their labour is progressing and there is a deep subconscious belief that the cervix can provide the answer.”

      That’s some pretty deep woo. And woo was not my first choice of noun.

  • just me

    Eh I hope you keep this blog. I’m one of the apparent few not on fb.

    • The Bofa on the Sofa

      I agree. I only use fb with a couple of relatives to deal with family things

    • Box of Salt

      I’m with Bofa and just me.

    • Guesteleh

      Pretty sure FB page is because of the book coming out and the need to establish a presence over there. Like it or not, FB is the 800 pound gorilla of the internet and anyone wanting to promote a project has to be on there.

      • SarahSD

        Yeah, I hope so. FB is not as good for keeping discussion organized, or for anonymity.

      • Amy Tuteur, MD

        Exactly!

    • Facebook pages for a brand exist to grow the brand, not the other way around.

    • I don’t do Facebook, either

    • Who?

      Me either, just to stay in touch with the kids when someone is out of the country.

  • Cobalt

    Like

    • SporkParade

      Poke?